The images for the original Dream Prisoner game were created in 1994 using 3D Studio 2. Things were definitely simpler then, although it’s fair to say that even back then, I barely scratched the surface of what was possible with 3D Studio 2. Let alone, then, what’s possible with 3D Studio Max 2010. I started […]

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The images for the original Dream Prisoner game were created in 1994 using 3D Studio 2. Things were definitely simpler then, although it’s fair to say that even back then, I barely scratched the surface of what was possible with 3D Studio 2. Let alone, then, what’s possible with 3D Studio Max 2010.

I started out doing rendering with Persistence of Vision, a tool which requires you to specify the scene to be rendered in a plain-text source file. It was something I had seen featured in a 1993 PC Format magazine, and – for those who actually managed to create beautiful images with it – was very difficult to use. With 3D Studio you could actually visually place your objects in a scene. Still, the only tools I really used were “create box” and “compound object” which yielded very heavy scenes that would all but lock up my old 386 computer.

Recently, I tried my hand again at modelling a few things with 3D Studio Max, where I actually modelled polygons; a big improvement for me from the “compound objects” days. Perhaps, one day, I might have enough skills to produce a new Dream Prisoner installment…

In the scene above, I used texture mapping on books on a shelf, and modelled a table and some office chairs.

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