Korenvliet - A text-adventure remake

It was back in the middle years of the 1980s that text adventures were at their height. They’d never again become as popular as they were then; in fact, the text adventure market all but collapsed around 1987. Companies like Infocom, Level 9 and Magnetic Scrolls authored many unforgettable games, and made millions – only […]

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It was back in the middle years of the 1980s that text adventures were at their height. They’d never again become as popular as they were then; in fact, the text adventure market all but collapsed around 1987. Companies like Infocom, Level 9 and Magnetic Scrolls authored many unforgettable games, and made millions – only to lose them again when the market went bust.

Korenvliet runningToday, text adventures still exist, but they are now exclusively in the domain of amateur developers – that is, unpaid – which is not to say that they aren’t any good. There are some excellent text adventure writers out there that can rival Infocom and Level 9. The genre of text adventures has come such a long way that powerful and versatile authoring toolkits now exists. Examples are Inform and TADS. A tool like TADS is in many ways more powerful and versatile then anything Infocom ever had available.

Somewhere around 1988 – if I recall correctly – I had a text adventure called Korenvliet. It was special, because it was written in Dutch. The adventure had some interesting puzzles, but the author had chosen not to include any room or object descriptions. Looking at it recently, I saw that is was written in GW-BASIC, and that there may have been no descriptions due to space concerns.

Because I have fond memories of playing (and not solving) this game, I’ve made a reimplementation in TADS (in English) based on the GW-BASIC source. The remake tries to be faithful to the original, in the sense that the original puzzles are there. However, it adds room and object descriptions to give the game more atmosphere.

The result is available for download:

Korenvliet is also available on Github.

Comments

7 7 Responses to “Korenvliet: A text adventure remake”
  1. JD says:

    Would you be willing to post your source? It might be interesting to port it to Inform, since TADS isn’t as readily available as Inform+Frotz are. Also, many of us are on non-windows systems, so it would a real plus.

  2. JD says:

    Would you consider posting your source code for this one? I think it would be interesting to play, and a small part of IF history. Unfortunately, TADS is not always the most accessible (read: you have to pay for it), and not all of us are on windows. But it might be interesting to port it to inform so that folks on windows, Linux, and other operating systems can run it :)

    • alex says:

      I may put the code on Gitlab so that others can work with it, or port it as they please. But as far I know TADS interpreters are free, aren’t they?

      • jd says:

        I guess there are more of them now than there used to be. I remember when the only game in town for TADS was Html TADS.

        Still, looking at FrobTADS, it’s a pretty big installation (23mb installed). I may have to play Korenvliet in it.

        But if you’re ever comfortable putting it on Github, that would be the awesome! :)

          • JD says:

            This is really cool! :) I remember the days of old text adventures in GWBASIC. I still have a copy of Adventureland and CIA Adventure. In the late 90’s, I attempted to implement my own, and got as far as writing a few rooms and a very, very rudimentary command parser. Those 2 word parsers were pretty clunky :)

  3. alex says:

    Korenvliet’s code is now on Github: https://github.com/henck/korenvliet

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